HCC Research Seminar: Tim Merritt

Title: Shape-Changing Interface Research: Small Steps To Address Grand Challenges.

Abstract: In this seminar, I will review the topic of “Shape-Changing Interfaces,” taking departure in our recent paper identifying “grand challenges” for the research community (Alexander et al 2018). Shape-changing interfaces have emerged as a new method for interacting with computers, using dynamic changes in a device’s physical shape for input and output. Roots of this research begin with Ivan Sutherland’s Ultimate Display (Sutherland 1965), which was a concept proposing a future in which a computer can “control the existence of matter.” Shape-changing interfaces change our fundamental approach to interaction design, expanding interactive systems to include our perceptual motor skills to support the same direct interaction our body has with the everyday world. They take advantage of our haptic and kinaesthetic senses, our instinctive perception of physical 3D forms, and provide inherent support for multi-user interaction. In this talk, I will show various examples from recent research that has made progress exploring and addressing the grand challenges. A critical perspective is adopted in the end of the seminar to temper the enthusiasm and to present possible “dark patterns” for shape-changing interfaces to show how things might go wrong in the future. I invite discussion to explore dark patterns and to help map out opportunities for addressing the grand challenges.

References
Alexander, Jason and Roudaut, Anne and Steimle, Jürgen and Hornbaek, Kasper and Bruns Alonso, Miguel and Follmer, Sean and Merritt, Tim. 2018. Grand Challenges in Shape-Changing Interface Research. In Proceedings of the 2018 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. ACM, New York.
Ivan E. Sutherland. 1965. The Ultimate Display. In Proceedings of the IFIP Congress. 506–508.

Where and When: Room 0.2.15, 4th of May 2018, 09:30-10:30

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Published article in Journal of IT Cases and Application Research

Intrafirm knowledge transfer of agile software practices: barriers and their relations

Lise Tordrup Heeager & Peter Axel Nielsen

Agile software practices are widely used in a great variety of organizations,

and the shift from traditional plan-driven approaches entails a redefinition
of processes in these organizations. Intrafirm knowledge transfer of agile
software practices between projects is a key concern in this redefinition.
While knowledge transfer is essential for an organization to develop or keep
its competitive advantage, it is also both difficult and time consuming, due
to a wide range of barriers. Transferring knowledge on agile practices is
even more complex due to there being a high degree of tacit knowledge.
Research on knowledge of agile practices focuses on adoption of agile
practices within a single team, thus extant research lacks focus on intrafirm
transfer. Through a case study, this article investigates the intrafirm knowledge
transfer of agile practices. With a starting point as the theory of
barriers to knowledge transfer, we modify and extend the framework to
transferring knowledge of agile practices. This framework is subsequently
applied for interpreting and analyzing the case study data. The analysis
shows how these barriers (e.g., the organizational culture, time and
resources, knowledge strategy, and motivation and willingness) are related
and that they cannot be understood in isolation. The barriers and their
relations are brought together in a conceptual model and its relevance is
discussed.

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Accepted paper for CHI’18

Designing the Desirable Smart Home: A Study of Household Experiences and Energy Consumption Impacts

Rikke Hagensby Jensen, Yolande Strengers, Jesper Kjeldskov, Larissa Nicholls, Mikael Skov

Abstract:  Research has shown that desirable designs shape the use and experiences people have when interacting with technology. Nevertheless, how desirability influences energy consumption is often overlooked, particularly in HCI studies evaluating the sustainability benefits of smart home technology. In this paper, we present a qualitative study with 23 Australian households who reflect on their experiences of living with smart home devices. Drawing on Nelson and Stolterman’s concept of desiderata we develop a typology of householders’ desires for the smart home and their energy implications. We structure these desires as three smart home personas: the helper, optimiser and hedonist, which align with desiderata’s three approaches to desire (reason, ethics and aesthetics). We use these insights to discuss how desirability can be used within HCI for steering design of the smart home towards sustainability.

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Upcoming HCC Research Seminar / Rikke H Jensen / 6th April

Rikke Hagensby Jensen
6th April 9:30-10:30 in 0.2.15

Title: Designing the Desirable Smart Home: A Study of Household Experiences and Energy Consumption Impacts

Abstract:  Research has shown that desirable designs shape the use and experiences people have when interacting with technology. Nevertheless, how desirability influences energy consumption is often overlooked, particularly in HCI studies evaluating the sustainability benefits of smart home technology. In this paper, we present a qualitative study with 23 Australian households who reflect on their experiences of living with smart home devices. Drawing on Nelson and Stolterman’s concept of desiderata we develop a typology of householders’ desires for the smart home and their energy implications. We structure these desires as three smart home personas: the helper, optimiser and hedonist, which align with desiderata’s three approaches to desire (reason, ethics and aesthetics). We use these insights to discuss how desirability can be used within HCI for steering design of the smart home towards sustainability.

 

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HCC Research Seminar / Jesper Kjeldskov / 23rd March

Jesper Kjeldskov
23rd March 9:30-10:30 in 0.2.15

The connected digital music ecosystem (DigiMUSE)

In this HCC seminar, I will present some of the ideas from the DigiMUSE project proposal, which was shortlisted for an AAU strategy grant. Music is a central fabric of society, connecting us across age, culture, geography, and other divides. An important aspect of enabling connected societies with ICT is, therefore, to work with our music industry on its digital transformation towards a contemporary and sustainable industry 4.0. Such transformation can happen by fully embracing ICT for connecting artists, technology and service providers, distributors, and consumers in new ways, that are profitable and valuable, and sustainable for all. However, the knowledge and tools for achieving this do not yet exist. In response, we ask how can we enable a sustainable digital ecosystem for community-driven creation, distribution and consumption of music and new music expressions and experiences? This is essentially a “wicked problem” requiring interdisciplinary research, as possible solutions will have to involve new combined knowledge for the world within technology, art/media, and business, juxtaposing the challenges and opportunities offered by these. Specifically, our core idea is to emancipate and change the creation, distribution, consumption, and expression/experience of music by conceiving and deploying new ICT-enabled systems, methods, and business models of a “connected digital music ecosystem”.

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S+I Research Seminar: Maria Kjærup

Title: Longitudinal Studies in HCI

Abstract: Longitudinal studies have been discussed and applied in HCI research for many years, and research has stressed the importance of such studies. But it has also traditionally been seen as somewhat cumbersome and labour-intensive. As a result, the actual role and significance of longitudinal studies in HCI research is still vaguely understood. In this presentation, I will present some interesting findings following a meta-analysis of 97 CHI papers retrieved from the period 1982-2017 in which longitudinal studies were reported. Also reported in a submission for CHI’18, with fellow colleagues and authors; Mikael, Peter and Jesper. The focus will be on themes; duration, metrics and change. Let’s open up a discussion on implications and possibilities for longitudinal studies in HCI.

Where and When: Room 0.2.15, 17 of November 2017, 09:30-10:30

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S+I Research Seminar: Stine Schmieg Lundgaard

Title: HCI challenges for human-building interaction.

Abstract: The fields of HCI and architecture are, to an increasing degree, intertwined. Using terms such as smart buildings or human-building interaction, interaction designers and architects are integrating digital technologies with our built environment. In this presentation, I talk about my current findings and reflections from an ongoing literature review within this field. Specifically, I will introduce my academic and professional background followed by an overview of key publications in the field of human-building interaction. I will conclude with my reflections on those publications which I hope will set the foundation for a constructive discussion on particular areas this could be explored.
Currently, I am aiming at submitting a paper from the literature review to TOCHI where a special call for papers on human-building interaction has been issued. Link to call: https://tochi.acm.org/category/call-for-papers/

Where and When: Room 0.2.15, 20 of October 2017, 09:30-10:30

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S+I Research Seminar: Vasiliki Tsaknaki

Title: Exploring preciousness for interaction design, by engaging in crafting, as a particular approach and attitude towards materiality and making.

Abstract: Practice-based design research in the interaction design domain can contribute with studying the many facets involved in a making process, including materials, tools or methods applied, while at the same time it can inform how users engage, interact with, but also value interactive technology in the long term. In this presentation I will talk about some of my research studies, in which I have been engaged in crafting, as a particular approach and attitude towards making interactive artefacts. In particular, I will focus on how crafting allowed me to articulate and explore preciousness for interaction design, which arrives from the core attributes and values that are embedded in crafts, and especially from the three craft attributes of impermanence, incompleteness and imperfection. Elaborating on preciousness can provide a way of reflecting on crucial aspects that seem predominant in contemporary computing, but it can also be utilized as a practical resource to guide the design of new interactive designs.

Where and When: Room 0.2.15, 22 of September 2017, 09:30-10:30

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Paper accepted at INTERACT 2017: Active Involvement of Software Developers in Usability Engineering: Two Small-Scale Case Studies

Nis and Jan Stage have co-authored a short paper that got accepted at INTERACT 2017.

Abstract

The essence of usability evaluations is to produce feedback that supports the downstream utility so the interaction design can be improved and problems can be fixed. In practice, software development organizations experience several obstacles for conducting usability engineering. One suggested approach is to train and involve developers in all phases of usability activities from evaluations, to problem reporting, and making redesign proposals. Only limited work has previously investigated the impact of actively involving developers in usability engineering. In this paper, we present two small-scale case studies in which we investigate the developers’ experience of conducting usability evaluations and participating in a redesign workshop. In both case studies developers actively engaged in both activities. Per the developers, this approach supported problem understanding, severity ratings, and problem fixing. At the organizational level, we found that the attitude towards and understanding of the role of usability engineering improved.

Nis Bornoe and Jan Stage. 2017. Active Involvement of Software Developers in Usability Engineering: Two Small-Scale Case Studies. Human-Computer Interaction – INTERACT 2017. Lecture Notes in Computer Science. Springer.

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